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Getting Started with Functional Developer

Contents


Contents
Copyright and Trademarks
Preface
Assumptions
About this guide
Conventions in this guide
The Dylan Reference Manual
Chapters in this guide
1 - Quick Start
1.1 - Starting work with Functional Developer
1.2 - The project window
1.3 - The Reversi project
1.4 - Building an executable application
1.4.1 - Building Reversi
1.4.2 - Running Reversi
1.5 - Three ways of running Dylan applications
1.6 - Looking at definitions and expressions
1.7 - Building DLLs
1.8 - Making changes to an application
2 - Fixing Bugs
2.1 - Rebuilding the application
2.2 - Problems at compile time
2.2.1 - Controlling the compiler's treatment of warnings
2.3 - Problems at run time
2.3.1 - Searching the stack backtrace for the cause of the error
2.3.2 - Browsing local variables
2.3.3 - Browsing definitions
2.3.4 - Fixing the error
2.3.5 - Loading the saved game back in
3 - Programming in Functional Developer
3.1 - Projects
3.1.1 - Projects and libraries
3.1.2 - Projects and deliverables
3.1.3 - Creating new projects
3.1.4 - Project files
3.1.5 - Project components
3.1.6 - Projects on disk
3.1.7 - Projects in the development environment
3.2 - Development models
3.2.1 - Interactive and incremental development
3.3 - Compilation
3.3.1 - Compiler databases
3.3.2 - Compilation modes
3.3.3 - Versioning
3.3.4 - Binding
3.3.5 - The build cycle
3.3.6 - Linkers
3.4 - Executing programs
3.4.1 - Starting applications up from within Functional Developer
3.4.2 - Application and library initialization
3.5 - Source, database, and run-time views
4 - Creating and Using Projects
4.1 - Creating a new project
4.1.1 - Specifying the type of the project
4.1.2 - Specifying the project name and location
4.1.3 - Choosing the libraries that the project uses
4.1.4 - The final page in the New Project wizard
4.1.5 - Examining the files in the Hello project
4.1.6 - Projects for GUI applications
4.1.6.1 - Creating a GUI project
4.1.6.2 - Examining and building the new GUI project
4.2 - Creating a project using the Custom library option
4.3 - Saving settings in the New Project wizard
4.4 - Advanced project settings
4.5 - Adding, moving, and deleting project sources
4.5.1 - Inserting files into a project
4.5.2 - Moving the position of a file within a project
4.5.3 - Deleting files from a project
4.6 - The project start function
4.7 - Project settings
4.7.1 - Compile page
4.7.2 - Link page
4.7.2.1 - Target File section of the Link page
4.7.2.2 - Base Address section of the Link page
4.7.2.3 - Version Information section of the Link page
4.7.2.4 - Windows Subsystem section of the Link page
4.7.3 - Debug page
4.8 - Project files and LID files
4.8.1 - Opening a LID file as a project
4.8.2 - Exporting a project into a LID file
5 - Learning More About an Application
5.1 - The browser
5.1.1 - Similarities between the browser and World Wide Web browsers
5.1.2 - Compiler databases and the browser
5.1.3 - Browsing a project in source and run-time contexts
5.2 - Browsing Reversi
5.2.1 - The Source page
5.2.2 - The General page
5.3 - Navigation in the browser
5.3.1 - Moving from one object to another
5.3.2 - Using the history feature
5.4 - Browsing a project's library
5.5 - Namespace issues in the browser
5.6 - Browsing run-time values of variables and constants
5.7 - Browsing local variables and parameters on the stack
5.8 - Browsing paused application threads
5.9 - Keeping browser displays up to date
5.10 - List of property pages
6 - Debugging and Interactive Development
6.1 - The debugger
6.2 - Debugger panes
6.2.1 - Context pane
6.2.2 - Stack pane
6.2.2.1 - Thread titles
6.2.2.2 - Call frames
6.2.2.3 - Local variables and call parameters
6.2.3 - Source pane
6.2.4 - Interaction pane
6.3 - Keeping debugger windows up to date
6.4 - Controlling execution
6.4.1 - Starting and stopping applications
6.4.2 - Pausing and resuming execution of applications
6.4.3 - Restarting applications
6.4.4 - Interacting with applications
6.5 - Debugging techniques
6.5.1 - Debugging executables
6.5.2 - Debugging DLLs
6.5.3 - Debugging OLE components
6.6 - Restarts
6.7 - Choosing an application thread to debug
6.8 - Changing the debugger layout
6.9 - Interacting with an application
6.9.1 - About the interaction pane
6.9.2 - Starting an interactive session with an application
6.9.3 - Interaction basics using the Dylan playground
6.9.4 - An example interaction with Reversi
6.9.5 - Interactive access to local variables and arguments on the stack
6.9.6 - Effects of interactive changes to application threads
6.9.7 - Interaction pane commands
6.10 - The active project
6.11 - Breakpoints
6.11.1 - How breakpoints work
6.11.1.1 - Setting breakpoints on functions
6.11.2 - Setting breakpoints on lines of code
6.11.3 - Browsing a project's breakpoints
6.11.4 - Breakpoint commands on the shortcut menu
6.11.5 - Breakpoint commands on the Application and Go menus
6.11.6 - Breakpoint options
6.12 - Stepping
6.12.1 - Step over
6.12.2 - Step into
6.12.3 - Step out
6.13 - Debugging client/server applications
6.14 - Exporting a bug report or a compiler warnings report
6.15 - Debugger options
6.15.1 - Stack options
6.15.2 - Exceptions options
6.15.3 - Miscellaneous options
6.16 - Just-in-time debugging
7 - Remote Debugging
7.1 - Running a Dylan application on a remote machine
7.1.1 - Installing the program and debugging server on the remote machine
7.1.2 - Starting the debugging server
7.1.3 - Starting an application remotely
7.2 - Attaching to running processes
8 - Dispatch Optimization Coloring in the Editor
8.1 - About dispatch optimizations
8.2 - Optimization coloring
8.2.1 - Editing colored source code
8.2.2 - Effect of compilation mode on dispatch optimizations
8.2.3 - Dispatch optimization colors and their meanings
8.3 - Optimizing the Reversi application
9 - Delivering Dylan Applications
9.1 - Delivering applications to customers
9.2 - Building a release folder
9.3 - Using the run-time library installer
9.4 - About the run-time library DLLs
10 - The Interactive Editor
10.1 - Introduction
10.2 - Invoking the editor and displaying files
10.2.1 - Display conventions
10.2.2 - Changing the editor options and layout
10.2.3 - The editor window's context: the active project
10.3 - Menu commands and special features
10.3.1 - Shortcut menus
10.4 - Using the editor for interactive development
10.5 - Source control with Visual SourceSafe
10.5.1 - What is the editor's source control interface?
10.5.2 - The SourceSafe menu commands
10.5.3 - Using the editor's source control interface
A - Creating COM Projects
A.1 - Working with COM type libraries
A.2 - An example COM server and client
A.2.1 - Creating the server stubs library
A.2.2 - Creating the server
A.2.3 - Creating the client stubs library
A.2.4 - Creating the client
A.2.5 - Testing the client and server pair
A.3 - Creating vtable and dual interfaces
A.4 - The type library tool and specification files
B - Functional Developer Console Environment
B.1 - About the Dylan console environment
B.2 - Using console-dylan in batch mode
B.3 - Using console-dylan interactively
B.4 - An example of console-dylan interactive functionality
C - Editor Options
C.1 - Keyboard bindings for editor commands
C.2 - Editing styles
C.3 - The Editor Options dialog
C.3.1 - Input page
C.3.2 - Editing page
C.3.3 - Display page
C.3.4 - Search page
C.3.5 - Restore page
Index

Getting Started with Functional Developer - 31 MAR 2000

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